Oxygen releasing indoor plants



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Oxygen releasing indoor plants

I've bought two indoor plants (one each from Kip's Plants and from Home and Garden) that each claim to do the same thing, that is to say, release oxygen into the air in a safe, safe way and in a controlled, safe way. I'm quite convinced that it is important to have oxygen in your indoor environment, although I understand that some of the people who live in very airtight conditions have no problems with no oxygen at all.

I've read this thread, but I'm still unsure about what a safe amount of oxygen is. I've also read the thread that suggests it may be an issue to buy a plant that has a big leaf, particularly if you don't live in an airtight building. I live in a very airtight apartment in London and I don't have any complaints at all.

The two indoor plants that I've bought (above) are identical. The only difference is that the one from Kip's plants comes with a small, clear, plastic tube that releases the oxygen from the top of the plant and one from Home and Garden has a bigger tube.

I'm very confident that the big tube is also safe to use, but I can't quite understand why the small tube is only recommended for use in a "fully open space".

I like the one from Home and Garden much more because it has an attachment that holds the tube in position while you water your plant. The plants from Kip's Plants are too delicate to use this attachment (as it is likely to break the plant), and I don't like the lack of attachment to the tube that the big tube has.

Both have a warning about it being only suitable for use when no pets are present and no children under 12 are in the room.But, as I'm unlikely to have either, is there any risk to the plant and I shouldn't be using them?

Sorry if this is very elementary, but I haven't found a clear answer anywhere online.

For me and most of my friends, we find it very important to avoid getting any air into our greenhouses and this should include being careful with the plastic tubes used to oxygenate plants. I always remove the tubes from my plants before I go out the greenhouse door. I don't think of the oxygenation tubes as anything but a danger to the plants. I just don't know how I would react if one of my babies got really burned and there was only one oxygen tube left. I'd probably start screaming. I know the ones I bought are safe, but I just don't have that confidence in mine.

I've never had a problem with my plants getting too much oxygen either. I think it depends on the greenhouse design, the climate and how much air is exchanged with the outside.

I just don't see any harm to using them, as long as you take the precautions suggested. You may be risking damaging some plants, which is never good, but I don't think it will cause any harm or take up too much air for the amount of time they are used. Just make sure you're well ventilated when using them. I leave one or two plants in each tank and keep the lid on.

Thank you very much for the answer, it does help! I'm going to try out the tubes with one of my little babies, he loves them!

The one thing that might be an issue with them is if you have a greenhouse that's in a hot area with hot summers, and a small amount of humidity. Sometimes the humidity inside the greenhouse can get too high. Even with an air intake, I've seen too many small greenhouses go into the "fog" or "frost" state where the water inside the plant leaves turns to ice, and your plants don't produce. That's why we have to ventilate the greenhouse.I've seen it happen with some people in their houses that have little vent holes in their wall, but have no fans or anything. When you have a greenhouse that gets too humid, it's better to put your plants somewhere else.

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In the final analysis, the most important test of the quality of your greenhouse is how easy it is to keep a supply of fresh, great-tasting tomatoes.

Thanks for all the useful info. Just bought a 6 gallon one today! I know exactly what you mean about humid greenhouses. We do get them very often here. I had to move my tomato plants in a couple years ago because they started losing their leaves and then their branches would fall off because they couldn't get the air they needed to.

I live in the midwest and it's a little on the warm side here too! I had one of my plants start turning yellow when it was just covered with leaves, the next day it had been killed off. I just bought my first plants this past week! It'll be an exciting summer!

I live in the midwest and it's a little on the warm side here too! I had one of my plants start turning yellow when it was just covered with leaves, the next day it had been killed off. I just bought my first plants this past week! It'll be an exciting summer!

That's when I know I have plants too close to the glass. The first week in our new greenhouse I just kept it up there and didn't worry about it. The second week I had my wife come and put some window film over the light and that helped keep things dry. Now I just check every morning to see how they are doing.

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"For every problem, there is an equal and opposite problem" - The Tao of Pooh

That's when I know I have plants too close to the glass. The first week in our new greenhouse I just kept it up there and didn't worry about it. The second week I had my wife come and put some window film over the light and that helped keep things dry. Now I just check every morning to see how they are doing.

This is the problem for me.I live in south central Pennsylvania. In our house, it's always 95-97 F with a 60% chance of thunderstorms. My plants have all been getting some sunlight for the past week, though, and they've been looking really good. The first day I brought them home, I left the greenhouse door open to dry it out, and it was so humid in there, it was like I was home in a jungle. I guess I'll have to be real strict about watering next time.

This is the problem for me. I live in south central Pennsylvania. In our house, it's always 95-97 F with a 60% chance of thunderstorms. My plants have all been getting some sunlight for the past week, though, and they've been



Comments:

  1. Earwine

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  2. Azaria

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  3. Bain

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  4. Hoireabard

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  5. Diamont

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